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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 05:06am - Jun 23,09
Posts: 1065

Post Posted: 11:57am - Jun 24,18 
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Fellows, what are your thoughts regarding my going to a sinking line when the duper is deeper? I have it in my mind that the one reason I am not getting fish to bite in higher water (but do with my ultralight)with the fly rod is that the wooly bugger or streamer is riding too high in the water. And there is the question of sink rates with sinking lines; something I never had to think about with floating lines.
I figure, what the heck. A few bucks for a sinking line and I have an extra spool with my 5wt reel.

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Chitown-Angler
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Joined: 07:28am - Oct 19,14
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Location: Chicago

Post Posted: 12:47pm - Jun 24,18 
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Maybe try a sink tip before buying a full sinking line. A clear tip or intermediate might also be something to check out.

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 10:11am - Feb 12,03
Posts: 422
Location: Lockport, IL

Post Posted: 04:25pm - Jun 25,18 
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For the Duper, I don't think you'll need much more than a Type-III sink tip (2-3 in/sec). It will definitely help getting down.

There will be a learning curve in how the line handles (you're going to want to learn to swing your flies across the river, downstream) and you may have to change how you approach the river.

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 05:06am - Jun 23,09
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Post Posted: 07:20pm - Jun 25,18 
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Is that the nomenclature? Sinking tip? I was looking in a fly fishing catalog and did not see any. A good idea though; try a sinking tip instead of a whole line.
O Great One, I approach the river, with these knees, slowly...very slowly. LOL.
I have been casting across and downstream with the wooly buggers and allowing them to sink then give a pull to bring them up imitating a crawfish.

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Chitown-Angler
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Joined: 02:26pm - May 16,05
Posts: 160
Location: South Elgin

Post Posted: 01:11pm - Jun 26,18 
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How about trying a bead head wooly bugger before switching lines? You can get some (or tie some) with tungston or heavier brass cone heads to get them down a bit.

Another option would be to try some sink putty - a soft moldable putty that you put on your line like a lead weight or you can mold it along a length of line

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 05:21pm - Mar 18,14
Posts: 92

Post Posted: 04:35pm - Jun 26,18 
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Try fluorocarbon, 8-12 lb test. Sinks and is thin so it cuts the current.

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 05:06am - Jun 23,09
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Post Posted: 03:09pm - Jun 27,18 
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Currently, I use a 3X tippett or smaller 4X. I do use beadhead wooly buggers; they are the autumn buggers of which I purchase from Bass Pro. They have yellow rubber legs. I but them in different sizes depending if I am using the 3wt rod or the 5wt.
Moldable putty...interesting, I would think that it would be difficult to stay in place or just plain fly off the line during casting. In that case, I could try tiny split shot.

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Chitown-Angler
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Joined: 07:28am - Oct 19,14
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Location: Chicago

Post Posted: 03:49pm - Jun 27,18 
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chuckt wrote:
Is that the nomenclature? Sinking tip? I was looking in a fly fishing catalog and did not see any. A good idea though; try a sinking tip instead of a whole line.
O Great One, I approach the river, with these knees, slowly...very slowly. LOL.
I have been casting across and downstream with the wooly buggers and allowing them to sink then give a pull to bring them up imitating a crawfish.



You can use a sink tip leader in between your fly line and regular leader. Sinking lines are rated by IPS which means inches per second. 1 IPS will sink slowly at 1 inch per second and something like a 7 IPS will sink very quickly at 7 inches per second.

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Chitown-Angler

Joined: 05:36pm - Mar 30,08
Posts: 1009
Location: Highland, IN

Post Posted: 04:07pm - Jun 27,18 
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In my experience, I’ve found fishing a weighted fly more effective than a sinking line. When I was really chasing smallies on the fly, my go to was basically a wooly bugger with lead dumb bell eyes and rubber legs. In deeper water Id ad a small split shot right on the nose of the fly. I think the jigging action is key. Most of the bigger fish would suck the fly in on the drop which you could only see by watching the line/leader connection. And when the fish were cooperative I’d fish poppers most of the time. Its a lot easier to snip off a weighted fly and add a little lighter tippet to switch up to surface fishing than to switch spools and re string the rod. But, Ive never fished the Dupage. Most of my smallmouth fishing is on the St Joe or the Big Lake.

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